The Federal Trade Commission today consented to examine video game loot boxes (similar to CSGO skins cases). Following an official demand by US Senator Maggie Hassan (D-N.H.).

In a Congressional oversight board hearing prior today, FTC director Joe Simons avowed Sen. Hassan’s ask for that plunders be explored. The trade occurred in a Senate Commerce subcommittee hearing that was chiefly centered around information security issues, yet which went into different domains.

Hassan said that the loot boxes will “represent a $50 billion industry by the year 2022,” likely referring to a report.

Game developers regularly incorporate loots enclosed in their diversions, which offer in-amusement lifts and prizes, which are optionally available also to purchase. The practice has thrived as of late, especially following colossal achievement in recreations like the FIFA franchise, though with complications.

Adding to the report, the Senator cautioned that kids are especially powerless to loots and that they speak to a “close connection” to betting.

Earlier this year, Senator Hassan wrote to the Entertainment Software Rating Board to ask how games with loot boxes are rated. The ESRB later added an “in-game purchases” label to games that include loot crates.

Not long ago, Senator Hassan kept in touch with the Entertainment Software Rating Board to ask how recreations with loot boxes are evaluated. The ESRB later included an “in-game purchases” name to games that incorporate loot cases.

Netherlands & Belgium had a couple of months ago, completely banned the purchase and usage of Loot boxes.